Exam Primer

Overview
1. Regulations and Policies
  • Authority and Regulations
  • Licence
  • License Penalties
  • Certificate
  • Operation, Repair
  • Content Restrictions
  • Operating Restrictions
  • Interference
  • Emergencies
  • Non-remuneration, Privacy
  • Call Signs
  • Other Countries
  • Frequency Bands
  • Power Allowed
  • unmodulated carriers, retransmission
  • amplitude modulation, frequency stability, me
  • International Telecommunication Union (ITU)
  • Exams
  • Antenna Structures
  • RF Field Strength
  • Resolving Complaints
  • 2. Operating and Procedures
  • VHF/UHF Repeaters - Voice
  • Phonetic Alphabet
  • Voice Operating Procedures
  • tuning, testing and dummy loads
  • Morse Code (CW) procedures
  • RST signal reporting, S meter
  • Q Signals
  • Emergency Operating Procedures
  • Record Keeping, Antenna Orientation and Maps
  • 3. Station Assembly, Practice and Safety
  • Layout of HF Stations
  • Layout of FM Transmitters
  • Layout of FM Receivers
  • Layout of CW Transmitters
  • Layout of SSB/CW receivers
  • Layout of SSB Transmitters
  • Layout of Digital Systems
  • Layout of Regulated Power Supplies
  • Layout of Yagi-Uda Antennas
  • Receiver Fundamentals
  • Transmitter, carrier, keying, AM
  • Carrier Suppression, SSB
  • Frequency and Phase Modulation
  • Station Accessories
  • Digital Modes
  • Batteries
  • Power Supplies
  • Electrical Safety
  • Antenna and Tower Safety
  • RF Exposure Safety
  • 4. Circuit Components
  • Amplifier Fundamentals
  • Diodes
  • Bipolar Transistors
  • Field-effect Transistors
  • Tiode Vacuum Tubes
  • Resister Color Codes
  • 5. Basic Electronics and Theory
  • Metric Prefixes
  • Basic Concepts
  • Circuits
  • Ohm's law
  • Series and Parallel Resistors
  • Power law, Resister Power Disipation
  • AC and frequency
  • Ratios, Logarithms and Decibels
  • Inductance and Capacitance
  • Reactance and Impedance
  • Magnetica and Transformers
  • Resonance and Tuned Circuits
  • Meters and Measurements
  • 6. Feedlines and Antenna Systems
  • Impedance and Feedlines
  • Balanced and Unbalanced feedlines
  • Feedlines and Connectors
  • Line Losses
  • Standing Wave Ratio
  • Impedance Matching
  • Isotropic Sources, Polarization
  • Wavelength vs Physical Length
  • Antenna Radiation Patterns
  • Vertical Antennas
  • Yagi Antennas
  • Wire Antennas
  • Quad/loop Antennas
  • 7. Radio Wave Propagation
  • Propogation Types
  • Ionospheric Regions
  • Hops and Skips
  • Ionosphere Issues
  • Solar Activity
  • MF and HF and Skywaves
  • VHF and UHF, Sporadic-E, Aurira, Ducting
  • Scatter - HF, VHF, UHF
  • 8. Interference and Suppression
  • Front-end overload
  • Audio Rectification, Bypass Capacitors, Ferri
  • Intermodulation, Spurious, Key-clicks
  • Harmonics, Splatter, Transmitter Adjustments
  • Filters
  • 1.12 Other Countries

    Practice


    B-001-14-01
    If a non-amateur friend is using your station to talk to someone in Canada, and a foreign station breaks in to talk to your friend, what should you do?
    Since you can talk to foreign amateurs, your friend may keep talking as long as you are the control operator
    Have your friend wait until you find out if Canada has a third-party agreement with the foreign station's government
    Report the incident to the foreign amateur's government
    Stop all discussions and quickly sign off

    B-001-14-02
    If you let an unqualified third party use your amateur station, what must you do at your station's control point?
    You must key the transmitter and make the station identification
    You must monitor and supervise the communication only if contacts are made on frequencies below 30 MHz
    You must continuously monitor and supervise the third party's participation
    You must monitor and supervise the communication only if contacts are made in countries which have no third party communications

    B-001-14-03
    Radio amateurs may use their stations to transmit international communications on behalf of a third party only if:
    the amateur station has received written authorization from Industry Canada to pass third party traffic
    the communication is transmitted by secret code
    such communications have been authorized by the countries concerned
    prior remuneration has been received

    B-001-14-04
    A person operating a Canadian amateur station is forbidden to communicate with amateur stations of another country:
    when that country has notified the International Telecommunication Union that it objects to such communications
    without written permission from Industry Canada
    until he has properly identified his station
    unless he is passing third- party traffic

    B-001-14-05
    International communications on behalf of third parties may be transmitted by an amateur station only if:
    English or French is used to identify the station at the end of each transmission
    the countries concerned have authorized such communications
    the countries for which the traffic is intended have registered their consent to such communications with the ITU
    radiotelegraphy is used

    B-001-14-06
    Amateur third party communications is:
    the transmission of commercial or secret messages
    a simultaneous communication between three operators
    none of these answers
    the transmission of non- commercial or personal messages to or on behalf of a third party

    B-001-14-07
    Third-party traffic is:
    any message passed by an amateur station
    coded communications of any type
    a message sent to a non- amateur via an amateur station
    any communication between two amateur operators

    B-001-14-08
    One of the following is not considered to be communications on behalf of a third party, even though the message is originated by, or addressed to, a nonamateur:
    messages that are handled within a local network
    messages addressed to points within Canada
    messages originated from Canadian Forces Affiliated Radio Service (CFARS)
    all messages received from Canadian stations

    B-001-14-09
    One of the following is not considered to be communications on behalf of a third party, even though the message may be originated by, or addressed to, a non-amateur:
    messages that originate from the United States Military Affiliated Radio System (MARS)
    all messages originated by Canadian amateur stations
    messages addressed to points within Canada from the United States
    messages that are handled within local networks during a simulated emergency exercise

    B-001-14-10
    Which of the following is not correct? While in Canada, the operator of a station licensed by the Government of the United States, shall identify the station using three of these identifiers:
    by adding to the call sign the Canadian call sign prefix for the geographic location of the station
    by radiotelephone, adding to the call sign the word "mobile" or "portable" or by radiotelegraph adding the oblique character "/"
    US radio amateurs must obtain a Canadian amateur station licence before operating in Canada
    by transmitting the call sign assigned by the FCC

    B-001-14-11
    Which of the following statements is not correct? A Canadian radio amateur may:
    pass third-party traffic with all duly licensed amateur stations in any country which is a member of the ITU
    pass messages originating from or destined to the United States Military Affiliated Radio System (MARS)
    pass messages originating from or destined to the Canadian Forces Affiliated Radio Service (CFARS)
    communicate with a similar station of a country which has not notified ITU that it objects to such communications